Two Women on Ministry & Culture

Hey Ladies.

I wanted to share two resources with you today.

One, if you or someone you know leads a small team and would like to hear from everyone about their experience this past year this questionnaire from Beth Moore may be helpful.

 Use it, adapt it, share it.

Then read this:

Two, this is a great article from Ann Voskamp about standing strong as women in the midst of a comparative culture.

 

I Spy… Educators!

So I was sorting through the mail this weekend… then flipping through the Washington Education Association’s latest news when I came across my friend Libby’s picture!! She and some teacher friends helped spread the word about WEA’s choice for their district’s Senate and were caught doing so. We’re proud of you, Libby! And not surprised to seeing you making an impact for education!

Btw, if you haven’t heard, WA passed the budget this summer, but not necessarily to everyone’s satisfaction… 😉

Another Perspective on Rest (Parenting & More)

In today’s post I reference an article from The Atlantic from about 5 years ago, written by a female politician who chose to quit her job in order to stay home with her teen son. It is a lengthy and controversial article, but the reason I share it with you today is because in the middle of our reading on Rest, it offers an opinion on the idea of Sabbath. Whether or nor you agree with what the author has to say about women, I found this interesting, she says: “one of the great values of the Sabbath—whether Jewish or Christian—is precisely that it carves out a family oasis, with rituals and a mandatory setting-aside of work.” This quote is found in the part of the article on “Revaluing Family Values” and compares a marathon runner’s training to a parent’s daily life.

What do you think about this perspective on…

1. Rest

2. Parenting

3. The rest of the article

 

Ancient Roots & Purpose of a Weekly Rest (Chapter 3, part 2)

Roots

In ancient Judaism, Sabbath was a day anticipated, and then reflected on.  Sabbath followers would spend 3 days preparing, 1 day observing and remembering, and 3 days looking back in gratitude for a day in which they were allowed to rest. At this time in history, people worked 7 days a week so some cultures viewed them as lazy for taking a day off. Other cultures, such as the Romans, similarly adopted a day off.

Thus, while the Jewish & Roman calendars aligned, Sabbath has been practiced in many ways by different people groups throughout time. The early Christians emphasized a day of gathering in celebration, as opposed to the Jewish Shabbat rest, and the day of the week shifted from Saturday to Sunday after the time of Christ (hint: think Resurrection Day).

As far back as creation in the Old Testament, we see the idea of Sabbath mentioned. With the giving of the 10 Commandments, there were 3 instructions about relating to God, 1 about the Sabbath and 6 about relating to others.  After the Exodus, the more detailed law was given to the Israelites to show them how to live as free people and included instructions about how to Sabbath. In the New Testament, Jesus seems to model a new approach to the law, again Sabbath is still included.

Purpose

It seems the original purpose of Sabbath was for the people to remember two things. First, that God worked for 6 days and then rested for 1, and so by living as He did we remember Him (and simultaneously remember we are not Him!). Second, the people who were slaves and never allowed a day off were now free. The symbols of the Sabbath meal included reminders of God’s provision and opportunity to thank Him.

In what other ways did people observe the Sabbath? Is there any relevance to today? Does it matter which day it is, what we do, or don’t do? I would agree with Kent that the Sabbath is more about freedom than rules, that it is an opportunity to receive the gift of rest and to remember that we are loved, but I also find it interesting to research. In studying and practicing the Sabbath today, we connect to an ancient past, remembering that the story is bigger and older than we are and that rest, freedom and love are available for all.

If you are curious to learn more, read chapter 3 of Keri Wyatt Kent’s book Rest, available here. Join us next week for chapter 4!

Resource: Team Personality

Several weeks ago, I shared some resources for exploring your unique personality, behavior & communication style. I came across another resources that addressed the idea of exploring these unique styles within a team or community, so I wanted to share. Here is the link for a video that sums up a 4-part blog series.

I also wanted to ask a question “in-between” individual and group personality. Do you think that couples exhibit personalities? How would you describe or characterize your couple personality, or that of a couple you’ve observed?

Writing in the present

Last week I shared how I realized about a year ago that I had always been curious about language and how I began setting aside time and space to write. Well, I wouldn’t have believed it if you had told me, but after a couple months pursuing time to write led to this blog. I knew it would take courage for me to share my writing and I needed some accountability in the discipline of making time for it.

What started out as a discipline and then something I shared with friends and family allowed me to begin to see themes and patterns in my writing. Still when people asked me: What do you write about? I had no idea how to answer. A natural question to “I’m spending time writing” yet the verbal lover was speechless.

I had more ideas than I had focus to pursue, so I tried to be patient and enjoy the process… and I did! Writing consistently has been therapeutic for my soul and eventually, I started working on a book. I had written various pieces and submitted them here and there in an effort to persist, but suddenly, words and ideas were taking shape and I felt compelled to write them.

I began writing the non-fiction book in April and wrote steadily for four months. I have a complete outline for ten chapters and I’m up to 24, 000 words. I took a break at the end of summer and haven’t had the enthusiasm to continue the last few months, but again, I’m letting it develop on its own timeline.

Meanwhile, I have renewed enthusiasm for the start of the blog’s second year and a clarity of focus for the direction it’s headed in. I streamlined all my posts (past and future) into three categories and added a page announcing that I’m available for freelance work.

I still have more ideas up my sleeve than time to act on them, but for the moment, I’m working on establishing the blog’s direction and pursuing freelance work.

You can help! Do you know anyone who would be encouraged by reading this blog? How about a business that needs copywriting services? Spread the word!

10 Jobs I Worked before Copywriting

  • babysitter
  • teaching assistant to French professor
  • burrito-maker (line server/cashier at Qdoba)
  • after school care
  • project manager (Choice Translating)
  • infant and toddler care (The Growing Place)
  • K-5th teacher/sub (Pickens County, Mead, District 81 Spokane, Central Valley, private school)
  • bookseller (Barnes & Noble)
  • Kids Lead (Soma Communities)
  • preschool assistant/teacher/aide/specialist (private school, Headstart)

New: Professional Freelance Copywriter

 

Resources: Personality, Behavior & Communication

Personality tests. They are all a bit different and I’ve taken a handful over the years. I went ahead and compiled a list of the ones I’ve taken here, along with a brief description and some links.

If you are just getting started, I’d recommend the first two. If you find these interesting and want to read more, #3 is a discussion in how the first two connect. I’d recommend #4 for a work or team setting, #5 if you work in a church or parachurch setting and #6 for anyone who wants to learn more about communication and relating in general.

  1. Four temperaments – click here to read a Christian perspective on 4 temps
  2. Meyers-Briggs type – probably the most well-known, 16 possibilities from a combination of your preferences for focus, taking in information, making decisions, and structure.  Take the free version
  3. Temperament-Type connection #1 – Keirsey and in chart form
  4. Disc – focuses more on behavior style, often used to help people communicate how to work and relate with others – free version
  5. Apestministry style – free version
  6. Life Languagescommunication style, this is the only one I was unable to find a free version for

Which of the above tests have you taken? Which would you recommend? Are there others you have taken or would recommend?

 

Teaching kids about finance

My dad has a background in finance, while mine is in education. He sent me this link recently which connects to conversations we’ve had about where our passions intersect. The question that we, and others, are asking is how are we preparing kids for life? Does, and should, education include things, such as how to manage money?

Humanity’s purpose, part 2

Based on the creation story, it would seem that there are certain tasks that God had in mind for all of humanity, as well as ones that were more specific to individuals. I think often part of our struggles come from being ignorant of, or forgetting, the distinction between the two. So, while operating in our individual strengths is part of what creates the beauty in the ALL, we are often quick to compare and decide “this” task or “that” person is better or worse than “this” or “that” other. Let’s celebrate the unique gifts we each bring to our world. Let’s focus on doing our part and maybe others will feel free to do theirs.

Tasks we are ALL called to…
  • help take care of the rest of creation
  • bring glory to the Father (talk about vague)
  • bear fruit by the Spirit’s power – love, joy, peace
Tasks YOU are called to uniquely…
  • Specific people – your family
  • your neighborhood
  • Specific tasks – your job